Sunday, 28 April 2013

How Hot Do Cars Get?

Spring is here and the weather is quickly warming up.  Soon it'll be time for road trips and day trips and all sorts of other trips that include you, your car, your best-est furry friend (maybe some other friends too) and the open road.  But what do you do with Fido when you have to stop and run into the store for a moment?  For the most part, pet parents will simply roll down a couple of windows and leave Fido in the car while they run in to shop or finish their chore list.

Innocent and simple right?  I mean, it couldn't hurt, could it?

WRONG. 
Fact of the matter is that in North America alone, between 30 and 40 dogs die from being left in their owner's car while the owner is in a store shopping etc..

What you need to realize is that if you're sweating and feeling over-heated while dressed in a t-shirt, shorts and sandals, how do you think Fido feels?  He's still wearing a fur coat!

So pet-parents be aware of the temperature outside - then add about 20 degrees and you'll have a close approximation of what the temperature in your car will be.  If you can't bear to sit in your car for any period of time without cranking the AC, don't expect your dog to be able to survive the same.

Stay safe and aware this season, and if that means leaving Fido at home or at a hotel while your go about your daily chores, then so be it.  Better that he be bored and a little lonely for an hour or two until your return than suffering from a hear stroke, or (heaven forbid) dead because of one.

Just remember - in your car, it's about 20 degrees hotter than the temperature outside!

poster provided by the Bishop Rance Veterinary Center



Keep your tails wagging safely!
Bear's P4ws

Friday, 26 April 2013

Creamy Tomato Chicken Bones


There is something almost magical about tomato soup (at least in my humble opinion).  Bear seems to agree with me on this, because whenever Bear smells tomato soup, he's at my feet looking at my cup (or bowl) as if it might hold the answers to the universe.  
Sadly tomato soup has WAY to much sodium and other added ingredients for any dog's digestive system and should never be shared with them.  BUT! Here at Bear's P4ws, we're always on the lookout for yummy Fido-friendly foodstuffs, and so - without further ado - we're happy to present these CREAMY TOMATO CHICKEN BONES! (It's tomato soup - but in a bone!)

Ingredients
1 Chicken breast, cooked and chopped
1 (6 ounce) can Tomato Paste
4 ounces Cream Cheese
1/2 cup shredded Mozzarella Cheese
1 1/2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.
2. In a large bowl add all ingredients and mix well.
3. Knead dough into ball and roll onto a heavily floured surface 1/4 inch thick and cut with your cookie cutter of your choice.
4. Place on your prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Cool and refrigerate.
Makes 3 to 4 dozen bones.
Remember to store them in an air-tight container in the fridge. 
(Original recipe can be found at Doggy Dessert Chef)
Enjoy
=)
Keep your tails wagging
Bear's P4ws

Thursday, 25 April 2013

Waggin' At Work - The Benefits of Pets in the Workplace



These days, pets are often treated as though they are family members, so why not pack them a briefcase of chew toys and kibble and bring them to work with you? Bringing pets to work is quickly becoming a common occurrence in offices, and it has been shown to reduce stress levels in employees and also has the added benefit of keeping our pets happy and healthy.

Four-Legged Office Mates

• 16% of all working people reportedly have office pets. 
• The top 10 types of office pets are: Fish, dogs, cats, tortoises, birds, rabbits, guinea pigs, geckos, snakes, and tarantulas. 
• 55% of workers admit that they would feel more motivated if they had pets at work. 

Puppy Love

Research has shown that employers who allow dogs in the workplace saw reduced stress levels among their employees. Nearly half of those who brought their dogs to work reported an increase in their overall productivity. 

• 25% of workers reported that dogs positively affected their productivity. 
• Stress levels decreased about 11% among workers on days they brought their dogs to work. 
• Employees who didn't bring dogs to the work felt a 70% stress level increase by the end of the workday. 

Workers brought their dogs to work with them an average of 22 times in 2012, compared with 17 times in 2008.

Creating a Pet-Friendly Workplace

While research points to a reduction in employee stress levels, having pets—particularly dogs—in the office has additional social and health benefits (according to the Purina pet food company). 


Additional Benefits

• Relaxed and Inspired. Having pets in the office can keep an employee relaxed and happy, which, in turn, makes work more enjoyable. 
• Coworker Cooperation. Pets can help strengthen relationships through interaction between colleagues and help otherwise shy employees become more engaged in the office. 
• Healthy Breaks. When lunchtime rolls around, dog owners are more likely to spend their breaks walking or playing with their dogs, which can provide a mental break and lower stress. 
• Work-Life Balance. For many workers who consider their pets as part of their families, allowing pets at work shows employers care about their employees and the balance between professional and personal time.
Before allowing pets at work, companies should enact policies regarding the pets’ behavior, considerations of employees’ allergies or fears of animals, and the overall office culture.

Furry Family Members

In 2012, about 48% of UK households reported having at least one pet. This equates to 13 million households.

DOGS:
• The UK dog population is around 8 million.
• About 23% of UK households own at least one dog.


CATS:

• The UK cat population is around 8 million. 
• About 19% of UK households own at least one cat.
While pets are proven to provide health benefits for their human counterparts, many pet owners are investing in pet insurance to help lower their veterinary bills and invest in their pets’ health.

• Pet insurance reportedly grew to more than $500 million in 2012.
Sources: Pet Food Manufacturer’s Foundation, Inc.com, Virginia Commonwealth University, The Guardian







View the original poster - complete with adorable graphics HERE

What about you?  How would you furnish your office to accommodate your fur-baby given the opportunity to bring him (her) to work?




Keep your tails wagging
Bear's P4ws

Tuesday, 23 April 2013

10 Amazing Things Your Probably Didn't Know About Your Dog


     1)      Many owners leave all their worldly possessions to their dogs


It is estimated that well over one million dogs in North America (the United States especially) are named as the primary beneficiary in their owners’ will


     2)      No matter what special breed your dog may be, his (or her) family tree started with a wolf


All dogs, across all breeds are descendants of wolves; dogs and wolves are technically (and scientifically) the same species


     3)      Trimming your dog’s  nails is not just about appearance



Many canine foot disorders come about as a result of untrimmed nails

     4)      Dogs can pin-point the source of a noise in 6/100ths of a second



They use their ultra-sensitive swiveling ears like super-charged satellite-radar dishes

     5)      Dogs have 3 eyelids



There’s the upper lid, the lower lid and a third lid called a nictitating membrane, or “haw” that helps keep the eye moist and provides protection


     6)      Some dogs have been known to live a VERY long time



The oldest known dog on record was an Australian cattle dog who lived to be well over 29 years old.


     7)      The death of a beloved dog is as painful as the passing of a human family member


The grief you and your family feels at the passing of your beloved pet is often as intense and pain-filled as the grief felt when a beloved human friend or family member passes.
 

     8)      Do you know how many breeds of dog there are?


....over 700

     9)      Your dog is missing a rather important (human) organ

           Dogs do no have an appendix

    10)   Dogs have an incredible sense of smell


The keen sense of smell that all dogs have allows them to locate incredible things: dead bodies under water, termites, natural gas buried deep in the earth and even human cancers!
(original list from Healthy Pets.com)


Dogs are pretty incredible aren’t they?
Keep your tails wagging
Bear’s P4ws 

Monday, 22 April 2013

When Planning Your Garden Keep This in Mind….



Now that spring is here, most of us can’t wait to jump into planning and digging out our back or front  For some, this may mean getting down and dirty and doing it all ourselves, while for others it means getting on the phone with the landscaper.  But before you plant your garden, keep in mind that your dog spends a great deal of time out the back – digging, rolling, playing, romping – and some of those beautiful fragrant flowers that you love are actually toxic and deadly for your dog. 
gardens.

Here at Bear’s P4ws we’ve done a little research for you and compiled a list of various plants, what part of the plant is toxic and how to tell if your dog may be having a reaction.

We hope you have a happy and beautiful spring, but remember to keep your garden pooch-friendly and Fido-safe.

Toxic or Slightly Toxic Plants
Name
Parts
Clinical
Signs
Apricot
Stem,
bark, seed pits

Azalea
(Rhododendron spp.) *
All
parts, mostly leaves
Stomach
irritation, abdominal pain, abnormal heart rate
and rhythm, convulsions, coma, some death.
Bird
of Paradise
Fruit,
seeds

Boston
Ivy
All
parts

Caladium
All
parts

Creeping
Charlie (Glecoma hederacea L.)
All
parts
Sweating,
drooling, usually not fatal.
Castor
Bean (Ricinus communis) ***
All
part but mostly seeds, if chewed
Nausea,
abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, tenesmus, dehydration,
shortness of breath, excessive thirst, weakness,
muscle twitching, convulsions, coma.
Choke
Cherry (Prunus virginiana) ***
Leaves,
seed pits, stems, bark

Daffodil
(Narcissus spp.)
Bulbs

Daphne
Berries,
bark, leaves

English
Ivy (Hedera helix L.)***
Leaves,
berries
Stomach
irritation, diarrhea, troubled breathing,
coma, death.
Foxglove
(Digitalis purpurea L.)  *
Leaves,
seeds, flowers

Glacier
Ivy
Leaves,
berries

Heartleaf
All
parts

Hemlock,
Water (Cicuta maculata L.) ***
All
parts, root and root stalk
Dilated pupils, frothing at the mouth, spasms
muscles spasms, restlessness, convulsions, and death (within 15 min to 2 hours)
Hyacinth
(Hyacinth orientalis)
Bulbs,
leaves, flowers
Colic,
vomiting and diarrhea, usually not fatal.
Hydrangea
(Hydrangea spp.)
Leaves,
buds
Irritation
and inflammation of the digestive tract, diarrhea,
bloody stool.
Jerusalem
Cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum L.)
All
parts, unripe fruit

Johnsongrass
(Sorghum halepense)  ***
Leaves
and stems, especially young plants.
Breathing
problems, severe anxiety, convulsions, coma,
death. Intravenous antidote exsist.
Jimson
Weed (Datura stramonium L.) ***
All
parts
Rapid
pulse, rapid breathing, dilated pupils, restlessness,
nervousness, twitching, frequent urination,
diarrhea, depression, weight loss, weak pulse, convulsions, coma, death.
Jonquil
Bulbs

Lantana
(Lantana camara L.) ***
Leaves
and berries
Sluggishness,
weakness, bloody diarrhea. In severe cases,
death may occur in 2 to 4 days.
Lily-of-the-Valley
(Convallaria majalis)
All
parts

Mandrake
Roots,
foliage, unripe fruit

Mistletoe
Berries

Morning
Glory
Seeds

Marble
Queen
All
parts

Nightshade
(Solanum spp.) ***
All
parts
Hallucinations,
severe intestinal disturbances, diarrhea, drowsiness,
numbness, dilated pupils, trembling, labored
breathing, nasal discharge, rapid heartbeat,
weak pulse, incoordination, paralysis or severe
shaking of the rear legs, rapid heart rate,
bloat, can be fatal.
Nephthytis,
Arrowhead Vine
All
parts




Pigweed,
Redroot (Amaranthus retroflexus) ***
Leaves,
stems, roots.
Troubled
breathing, trembling, weakness, coma, death.
Poinsettia
(Euphorbia pulcherrima)
Leaves,
flowers
Not
lethal
, but can cause skin, mouth, eye,
and stomach irritation.
Pokeweed,
Inkberry **
All
parts
Colic,
diarrhea, blood in stool, rare cases anemia,
and possible death.
Parlor
Ivy
All
parts

Red
Sage
Green
berries

Rhubarb
(Rheum rhaponticum) **
Leaves
Staggering,
trembling, breathing difficulties, weakness,
diarrhea, increased drinking and urinating,
death.
Red
Princess
All
parts

Saddleleaf
All
parts

Tulip
(Tulipa spp.)
Bulbs

Umbrella
Plant
All
parts

Yew,
English (Taxus baccata) and Japanese (Taxus
cuspidata Sieb. & Zucc.) ***
n/a
Breathing
problems, trembling, weakness, heart problems,
stomach upset, very sudden death.


Keep your tails wagging
Bear's P4ws

Friday, 19 April 2013

MASSIVE RECALL ALERT: Natura Pet Expands Recall – Evo, Innova, California Natural, Karma & Healthwise


Natura Pet has just released information regarding a massive voluntary recall on the following brands of dry dog (and cat and ferret) food and treats: Evo, Innova, California Natural, Karma, and Healthwise. Canned products are NOT affected by this recall.

The recall includes EVERY dry food or treat product with an expiration date on or before March 24, 2014. This recall is an expansion of an earlier recall due to the possibility of Salmonella contamination. For more information regarding the original recall, click here.


From the Natura Pet website:

" Dear Natura Family,       
On March 18, 2013, we informed you of a voluntary recall on select Natura products.
Out of an abundance of caution, we are extending our recall to include all Natura dry dog, cat and ferret food and treats that have expiration dates on or before March 24, 2014. We are sorry for the disruption, but we simply want to ensure that every product meets our highest quality standards.
Natura canned products and Mother Nature biscuits are not affected.
Please read below for more information about the recalled products and how to replace your pet food if it is included.

Your pet’s health and safety are our #1 priority. We are taking all actions necessary to ensure that our products meet both your expectations and ours. Our Fremont plant has been focused on quality enhancements and is now shipping new product to stores that will be on shelves soon.
As fellow pet owners feeding Natura products, we share your disappointment and again, we are very sorry. For additional inquiries, contact us at http://www.naturapet.com/about/contact-us or (800) 224-6123.

Sincerely,
Employees of Natura Pet Products

Updated Product Information
Natura has issued a voluntarily recall of all dry products with an expiration date on or before March 24, 2014, for the following brands.

Innova
EVO
California Natural
HealthWise
Karma

Replacement Product Information
If your product is affected, and you would like a replacement, please download this form and follow the instructions."

Let us know how this recall affects you and your furry family - and will it effect the trust you put in Natura Pet in the future?

Keep your tails wagging
Bear's P4ws

Thursday, 18 April 2013

RECALL ALERT: Breeder’s Choice Recalls Active Care Healthy Joint Dog Treats


Breeder’s Choice Pet Food of Irwindale, California has has issued a voluntary recall for a single batch of Active Care Biscuits-Healthy Dog Treats due to the presence of mold.

The recalled product includes the following information:
 Breeder’s Choice Active Care Healthy Joint Treats
 Product Code/SKU/ Material #: BCP-080
 UPC Code: 0130104895
 Size: 24 ounces
 Best Before Code: 19-Dec-2013
Products and product lots that do not appear in the above lists have not been affected.

According to a release from the manufacturer, the mold seems to have occurred due to varying dryer temperature settings for drying biscuits. This exposed the recalled product to excess moisture and has since been remedied.

Pet owners who fed their pets the recalled biscuits should watch for symptoms that may develop. Common symptoms associated with mold exposure include gastrointestinal issues such as loose stool.
At the time of this release, there have been no reports of human or pet illnesses associated with this recall.
What to Do?
For information, consumers are asked to call Central Customer Care line at 866-500-6286 or visit http://www.goactivedog.com
You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.
Original notification from the Dog Food Advisor

Keep your tails wagging
Bear's P4ws